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Blogs On the Net

There are more blogs on the net that can be counted. There is a blog for peer-reviewed research blogs. The following link lists concatenated blog entries from various blogs related to virology:    Research Blogging
A new blog from VIROLOGY: http://www.virologyhighlights.com
Below are entries from specific blogs, all listed on the Research Blogging (http://researchblogging.org/) site.

Virology blog by Vincent Racaniello Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology at Columbia University Medical Center.

virology blog
About viruses and viral disease
Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:25:00 +0000

    TWiV 299: Rocky Mountain virology
    On episode #299 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana and speaks with Marshall Bloom, Sonja Best, and Byron Caughey about their work on tick-born flaviviruses, innate immunity, and prion diseases. You can find TWiV #299 at www.twiv.tv.
    Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:25:00 +0000

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and viruses
    Many people have a new awareness of the disease known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, thanks to the Ice Bucket Challenge initiated by the ALS Association. Fewer might know that retroviruses have been proposed to play a role in the development of the disease. I previously summarized a 2008 paper on ALS in a piece called […]
    Sun, 24 Aug 2014 13:29:45 +0000

    TWiV 298: MV-NIS de myelo
    On episode #298 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiV gang answers follow-up questions about the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, then discuss treatment of  disseminated multiple myeloma with oncolytic measles virus. You can find TWiV #298 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 17 Aug 2014 16:00:09 +0000

    Celebrating 300 episodes of This Week in Virology
    This Week in Virology, the podcast about viruses – the kind that may or may not make you sick, celebrates its 300th episode on Tuesday, August 26, 2014 with a live recording at the Washington, DC headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology. This special episode will be part of the ‘Microbes after Hours’ series, […]
    Wed, 13 Aug 2014 14:40:10 +0000

    TWiV 297: Ebola! Don’t panic
    On episode #297 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVites present an all-ebolavirus episode, tackling virology, epidemiology, and approaches to prevention and cure that are in the pipeline. You can find TWiV #297 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 10 Aug 2014 15:05:49 +0000

    Ebolavirus vaccines and antivirals
    As the epidemic of Zaire ebolavirus in Western Africa continues (1,779 cases and 961 deaths in four countries), many are questioning why there are no means of preventing or stopping infection. In the past two decades there has been substantial research into developing and testing active and passive vaccines and antiviral drugs, although none have yet been licensed for use […]
    Fri, 08 Aug 2014 20:01:28 +0000

    Zaire ebolavirus in West Africa
    Dr. Tom Solomon is Director of the Institute for Infection and Global Health at the University of Liverpool. Here he speaks with Vincent Racaniello about the 2014 outbreak of Zaire ebolavirus in West Africa. Dr. Solomon discusses why the epidemic has spread, how it might be curtailed, the return of two infected health workers back to the […]
    Fri, 08 Aug 2014 05:00:34 +0000

    TWiV 296: The real Batman, Linfa Wang
    On episode #296 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits the Australian Animal Health Laboratory in Geelong, Australia and speaks with Linfa about his work on bats and bat viruses. You can find TWiV #296 at www.twiv.tv. After recording this episode, Vincent and Linfa drove to a nearby golf course where they watched a colony of […]
    Sun, 03 Aug 2014 13:48:30 +0000

    Scientists for Science
    Scientists for Science are confident that biomedical research on potentially dangerous pathogens can be performed safely and is essential for a comprehensive understanding of microbial disease pathogenesis, prevention and treatment. The results of such research are often unanticipated and accrue over time; therefore, risk-benefit analyses are difficult to assess accurately. If we expect to continue […]
    Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:08:41 +0000


The Microbe Blog - by Moselio Schaechter & Merry Youle American Society for Microbiology:

Small Things Considered
A blog for sharing appreciation of the width and depth of microbes and microbial activities on this planet.
2014-08-26T04:58:00-07:00

    Watch This Week in Virology Episode 300 Live from ASM HQ tonight at 7 pm ET
    This Week in Virology, the podcast about viruses, celebrates its 300th episode on Tuesday, August 26, 2014 with a live recording at the Washington, DC headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology. This special episode will be part of the ‘Microbes after Hours’ series, and will feature the TWiV hosts
    2014-08-26T04:58:00-07:00

    The Curious Case of a Protein and a Pilus
    by Monika Buczek | If you’re like me, every morning you reluctantly roll out of bed and automatically reach for your toothbrush. One of the earliest learned practices of personal hygiene, brushing surely serves more than just preventing daybreak halitosis- but have you ever pondered about the plaque you try to dislodge from your…
    2014-08-25T04:00:00-07:00

    Precision of Cell Division (Talmudic Question #112.2)
    by Conrad Woldringh | In Talmudic Question #112, the question was asked: "Many, perhaps most bacteria, divide into daughter cells of almost precisely the same size. Why is that?" An answer may be found when measuring the precision of cell division as a function of cell shape. The precision of cell division is given…
    2014-08-22T12:01:52-07:00

    TWiM #85: Oscillation in the Ocean and a Verona Integron
    Vincent, Elio, Michael, and Michele discuss the diel transcriptional rhythms of bacterioplankton communities in the ocean, and extensively drug resistant Pseudomonas in Ohio.
    2014-08-22T04:00:00-07:00

    Talmudic Question #112
    Many, perhaps most bacteria, divide into daughter cells of almost precisely the same size. Why is that?
    2014-08-21T04:00:00-07:00


Laikaspoetnik Blog Virology/Infectious Diseases entries:

To Retract or Not to Retract… That’s the Question
In the previous post I discussed [1] that editors of Science asked for the retraction of a paper linking XMRV retrovirus to ME/CFS. The decision of the editors was based on the failure of at least 10 other studies to confirm these findings and on growing support that the results were caused by contamination. When the authors refused […]
Tue, 07 Jun 2011 13:34:25 +0000

Science Asks to Retract the XMRV-CFS Paper, it Should Never Have Accepted in the First Place.
Wow! Breaking! As reported in WSJ earlier this week [1], editors of the journal Science asked Mikovits and her co-authors to voluntary retract their 2009 Science paper [2]. In this paper Mikovits and colleagues of the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) and the Cleveland Clinic, reported the presence of xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells […]
Thu, 02 Jun 2011 21:34:34 +0000

Does the NHI/FDA Paper Confirm XMRV in CFS? Well, Ditch the MR and Scratch the X… and… you’ve got MLV.
The long awaited paper that would ‘solve’ the controversies about the presence of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related virus (XMRV) in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was finally published in PNAS last week [1]. The study, a joint effort of the NIH and the FDA, was withheld, on request of the authors [2], because it contradicted […]
Mon, 30 Aug 2010 03:32:21 +0000