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Blogs On the Net

There are more blogs on the net that can be counted. There is a blog for peer-reviewed research blogs. The following link lists concatenated blog entries from various blogs related to virology:    Research Blogging
A new blog from VIROLOGY: http://www.virologyhighlights.com
Below are entries from specific blogs, all listed on the Research Blogging (http://researchblogging.org/) site.

Virology blog by Vincent Racaniello Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology at Columbia University Medical Center.

virology blog
About viruses and viral disease
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 15:16:43 +0000

    TWiV 303: Borna this way
    On episode #303 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiV team discusses transmission of Ebola virus, and inhibition of Borna disease virus replication by viral DNA in the ground squirrel genome. You can find TWiV #303 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 21 Sep 2014 15:16:43 +0000

    What we are not afraid to say about Ebola virus
    In a recent New York Times OpEd entitled What We’re Afraid to Say About Ebola, Michael Osterholm wonders whether Ebola virus could go airborne: You can now get Ebola only through direct contact with bodily fluids. If certain mutations occurred, it would mean that just breathing would put one at risk of contracting Ebola. Infections could spread […]
    Fri, 19 Sep 2014 01:47:55 +0000

    TWiV 302: The sky is falling
    On episode #302 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVers discuss the growing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, and an epidemic of respiratory disease in the US caused by enterovirus D68. You can find TWiV #302 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:02:31 +0000

    An outbreak of enterovirus 68
    During the winter of 1962 in California, a new virus was isolated from the oropharynx of 4 children who had been hospitalized with respiratory disease that included pneumonia and bronchiolitis. On the basis of its physical, chemical, and biological properties, the virus was classified as an enterovirus in the picornavirus family. Subsequently named enterovirus D68, it […]
    Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:45:50 +0000

    TWiV 301: Marine viruses and insect defense
    On episode #301 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent travels to the International Congress of Virology in Montreal and speaks with Carla Saleh and Curtis Suttle about their work on RNA interference and antiviral defense in fruit flies, and viruses in the sea, the greatest biodiversity on Earth. You can find TWiV #301 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 07 Sep 2014 11:54:12 +0000

    The Berlin patient
    Since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, an estimated 75 million people have been infected with HIV. Only one person, Timothy Ray Brown, has ever been cured of infection. Brown was diagnosed with HIV while living in Berlin in 1995, and was treated with anti-retroviral drugs for more than ten years. In 2007 he was diagnosed with […]
    Sat, 06 Sep 2014 13:03:19 +0000

    TWiV 300: So happy together
    Recording together for the first time, the hosts of the science show This Week in Virology celebrate their 300th recording at the American Society for Microbiology headquarters in Washington, DC, where Vincent  speaks with Dickson, Alan, Rich, and Kathy about their careers in science. You can find TWiV #300 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:09:52 +0000

    Poliovirus escapes antibodies
    Antigenic variation is a hallmark of influenza virus that allows the virus to evade host defenses. Consequently influenza vaccines need to be reformulated frequently to keep up with changing viruses. In contrast, antigenic variation is not a hallmark of poliovirus – the same poliovirus vaccines have been used for nearly 60 years to control infections by […]
    Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:11:18 +0000

    TWiV 299: Rocky Mountain virology
    On episode #299 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana and speaks with Marshall Bloom, Sonja Best, and Byron Caughey about their work on tick-born flaviviruses, innate immunity, and prion diseases. You can find TWiV #299 at www.twiv.tv.
    Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:25:00 +0000


The Microbe Blog - by Moselio Schaechter & Merry Youle American Society for Microbiology:

Small Things Considered
A blog for sharing appreciation of the width and depth of microbes and microbial activities on this planet.
2014-09-21T21:00:00-07:00

    Shigella Steals Host Nutrients... Economically
    by S. Marvin Friedman | Intracellular pathogens face many daunting problems, among them how to obtain enough energy and nutrients for active growth while, preferably, keeping the host cell alive for as long as possible. This issue is especially acute for pathogens that grow at a fast rate and reach large numbers. When they succeed…
    2014-09-15T06:54:09-07:00

    TWiM #86: Blurring the Line Between Organelle and Endosymbiont
    Vincent, Elio, Michael, and Michele consider whether our eating behavior is manipulated by gastrointestinal microbiota, and an aphid gene of bacterial origin whose gene product encodes a protein that is transported to an obligate endosymbiont.
    2014-09-19T05:41:38-07:00

    Welcome to Autumn
    by Elio | This blog is in its eighth year, a fairly long life as blogs go. We continue to enjoy sharing with you the excitement of unexpected and unusual stories of the microbial world. Not all of it is the latest. You may have noticed if you visit this site with some frequency…
    2014-09-18T09:08:57-07:00

    Watching an Endosymbiont Becoming an Organelle?
    by Elio | Ah, endosymbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic cells… Wasn't this one of the grandest of all the grand events in Biology? In its ability to boggle the mind, it comes in second only to the origin of life. This, one of the most decisive events in evolution, had a unique character. Instead of new traits being acquired gradually, a whole bunch of them were transferred at once to a willing recipient. A single step...
    2014-09-14T20:20:00-07:00

    Of Terms in Biology: Metagenomic Binning
    by Christoph Weigel | Summer's almost gone. Imagine you're strolling along the shores of a lake enjoying nature's colors during sunset. Sparkle catches your eyes where the lake languidly laps against the shore. You start pondering whether microbes — and if so which ones, and how many different — cause these glistening, somewhat slimy foam flakes at the shore. Sure enough, you take samples!
    2014-09-10T20:34:00-07:00


Laikaspoetnik Blog Virology/Infectious Diseases entries:

To Retract or Not to Retract… That’s the Question
In the previous post I discussed [1] that editors of Science asked for the retraction of a paper linking XMRV retrovirus to ME/CFS. The decision of the editors was based on the failure of at least 10 other studies to confirm these findings and on growing support that the results were caused by contamination. When the authors refused […]
Tue, 07 Jun 2011 13:34:25 +0000

Science Asks to Retract the XMRV-CFS Paper, it Should Never Have Accepted in the First Place.
Wow! Breaking! As reported in WSJ earlier this week [1], editors of the journal Science asked Mikovits and her co-authors to voluntary retract their 2009 Science paper [2]. In this paper Mikovits and colleagues of the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) and the Cleveland Clinic, reported the presence of xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells […]
Thu, 02 Jun 2011 21:34:34 +0000

Does the NHI/FDA Paper Confirm XMRV in CFS? Well, Ditch the MR and Scratch the X… and… you’ve got MLV.
The long awaited paper that would ‘solve’ the controversies about the presence of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related virus (XMRV) in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was finally published in PNAS last week [1]. The study, a joint effort of the NIH and the FDA, was withheld, on request of the authors [2], because it contradicted […]
Mon, 30 Aug 2010 03:32:21 +0000