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Blogs On the Net

There are more blogs on the net that can be counted. There is a blog for peer-reviewed research blogs. The following link lists concatenated blog entries from various blogs related to virology:    Research Blogging
A new blog from VIROLOGY: http://www.virologyhighlights.com
Below are entries from specific blogs, all listed on the Research Blogging (http://researchblogging.org/) site.

Virology blog by Vincent Racaniello Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology at Columbia University Medical Center.

virology blog
About viruses and viral disease
Sun, 06 Jul 2014 20:43:34 +0000

    TWiV 292: Medimmune goes viral
    On episode #292 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits Medimmune and speaks with Wade, Matt, Nicole, and Ken about why they work in industry and their daily roles in a biotechnology company. You can find TWiV #292 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 06 Jul 2014 20:43:34 +0000

    The value of influenza aerosol transmission experiments
    A Harvard epidemiologist has been on a crusade to curtail aerosol transmission experiments on avian influenza H5N1 virus because he believes that they are too dangerous and of little value. Recently he has taken his arguments to the Op-Ed pages of the New York Times. While Dr. Lipsitch is certainly entitled to his opinion, his arguments […]
    Sat, 05 Jul 2014 01:06:20 +0000

    TWiV 291: Ft. Collins abuzz with virologists
    Vincent, Rich, and Kathy and their guests Clodagh and Ron recorded episode #291 of the science show This Week in Virology at the 33rd annual meeting of the American Society for Virology at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, Colorado. You can find TWiV #291 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 29 Jun 2014 15:17:53 +0000

    Implications of finding poliovirus in sewers of Brazil and Israel
    Wild poliovirus has been detected in the sewers of Brazil and Israel. Fortunately, no cases of poliomyelitis have been reported in either country. Why is poliovirus present in these countries and what are the implications for the eradication effort? Wild type poliovirus (e.g. not vaccine-derived virus) was detected in sewage samples that had been collected […]
    Sat, 28 Jun 2014 21:18:40 +0000

    TWiV 290: Baylor goes viral
    On episode #290 of the science show This Week  in Virology, Vincent meets up with Janet Butel and Rick Lloyd at Baylor College of Medicine to talk about their work on polyomaviruses and virus induced stress. You can find TWiV #290 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 22 Jun 2014 18:39:59 +0000

    Reconstruction of 1918-like avian influenza virus stirs concern over gain of function experiments
    The gain of function experiments in which avian influenza H5N1 virus was provided the ability to transmit by aerosol among ferrets were met with substantial outrage from both the press and even some scientists; scenarios of lethal viruses escaping from the laboratory and killing millions proliferated (see examples here and here). The recent publication of […]
    Fri, 20 Jun 2014 20:29:14 +0000

    TWiV 289: Vinny and the capsids
    On episode #289 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vinny and the capsids answer listener questions about the definition of life, state vaccination laws, the basic science funding problem, viral ecology, inactivation of viruses by pressure, and much more. You can find TWiV #289 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 15 Jun 2014 14:45:37 +0000

    Origin of segmented RNA virus genomes
    Segmented genomes abound in the RNA virus world. They are found in virus particles from different families, and can be double stranded (Reoviridae) or single stranded of (+) (Closteroviridae) or (-) (Orthomyxoviridae) polarity. Our recent discussion of the advantages of a segmented viral genome, compared with monopartitie genomes, generated a good discussion. Another interesting question concerns the evolutionary relationship between the two […]
    Thu, 12 Jun 2014 21:13:57 +0000

    TWiV 288: ebircsnart esreveR
    On episode #288 of the science show This Week in Virology, the Twivsters discuss how reverse transcriptase encoded in the human genome might produce DNA copies of RNA viruses in infected cells. You can find TWiV #288 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 08 Jun 2014 16:08:34 +0000


The Microbe Blog - by Moselio Schaechter & Merry Youle American Society for Microbiology:

Small Things Considered
A blog for sharing appreciation of the width and depth of microbes and microbial activities on this planet.
2014-07-10T04:00:00-07:00

    Pictures Considered #18. Pictures of Shigella by Shiga
    by Elio | The journal Zentralblatt für Bakteriologie, Parasitenkunde u. Infektionskrankheiten was one of the leading publication in the early days of Microbiology. Many of the great discoveries of microbial pathogens were published therein. An example is the 1898 Japanese microbiologist Kiyoshi Shiga account of his discovery of his eponymous bacterium…
    2014-07-10T05:48:58-07:00

    Plant Pathogen Silences Host’s Immune Genes
    by S. Marvin Friedman | As more and more information becomes available, one marvels (and also frets) at the sophisticated strategies that pathogens have evolved in order to evade their hosts’ defense mechanisms. Many pathogens of plants and animals deliver effectors into their hosts in order to suppress immune responses. To date, the vast majority of…
    2014-07-07T11:36:14-07:00

    Talmudic Question #110
    Suppose an innovative fungal symbiont in a lichen decided to appropriate its algal partner's plastids and do away with having to pay the algae for their services. What would it have to gain, or lose thereby?
    2014-07-03T04:00:00-07:00

    TWiM #81: Cold iron is the master of them all
    Vincent, Michael, and Michele discuss how iron might disperse bacterial biofilms in carotid arterial plaques, and controlling Salmonella by modulating host iron homeostasis.
    2014-06-29T20:46:14-07:00

    Microbe, Enzyme or Mineral? A Riddle in the Soil
    by Maddie Stone | When most people look at soil, they just see dirt. When I look at soil, I see billions of microorganisms crawling atop one another, consuming the dead in a feasting frenzy that stops for nothing save a deep freeze. I see microbes and their enzymes, the digestive juices that break…
    2014-06-16T09:21:26-07:00


Laikaspoetnik Blog Virology/Infectious Diseases entries:

To Retract or Not to Retract… That’s the Question
In the previous post I discussed [1] that editors of Science asked for the retraction of a paper linking XMRV retrovirus to ME/CFS. The decision of the editors was based on the failure of at least 10 other studies to confirm these findings and on growing support that the results were caused by contamination. When the authors refused […]
Tue, 07 Jun 2011 13:34:25 +0000

Science Asks to Retract the XMRV-CFS Paper, it Should Never Have Accepted in the First Place.
Wow! Breaking! As reported in WSJ earlier this week [1], editors of the journal Science asked Mikovits and her co-authors to voluntary retract their 2009 Science paper [2]. In this paper Mikovits and colleagues of the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) and the Cleveland Clinic, reported the presence of xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells […]
Thu, 02 Jun 2011 21:34:34 +0000

Does the NHI/FDA Paper Confirm XMRV in CFS? Well, Ditch the MR and Scratch the X… and… you’ve got MLV.
The long awaited paper that would ‘solve’ the controversies about the presence of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related virus (XMRV) in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was finally published in PNAS last week [1]. The study, a joint effort of the NIH and the FDA, was withheld, on request of the authors [2], because it contradicted […]
Mon, 30 Aug 2010 03:32:21 +0000