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Blogs On the Net

There are more blogs on the net that can be counted. There is a blog for peer-reviewed research blogs. The following link lists concatenated blog entries from various blogs related to virology:    Research Blogging
A new blog from VIROLOGY: http://www.virologyhighlights.com
Below are entries from specific blogs, all listed on the Research Blogging (http://researchblogging.org/) site.

Virology blog by Vincent Racaniello Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology at Columbia University Medical Center.

virology blog
About viruses and viral disease
Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:33:21 +0000

    Virus gifts
    Looking to give a virus-themed gift to someone this year? Here are some suggestions. As expected Ebola virus dominated. Where are the EV-D68 items? An Ebola Texas shirt from VineFreshTees: Virus tree ornaments made of wood at BuenoMarket: Viral mugs at Thefty: Artologica always has fabulous microbe art, including this swine flu watercolor: A favorite […]
    Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:33:21 +0000

    The American Society for Virology
    The American Society for Virology was founded in 1981 to promote the exchange of information and stimulate discussion and collaboration among scientists active in all aspects of virology. These goals are achieved in part by organizing an annual meeting that brings together virologists from diverse fields to discuss their work. As the current President of the […]
    Tue, 16 Dec 2014 01:52:55 +0000

    TWiV 315: Must be something in the water
    On episode #315 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent, Alan, Rich and Kathy discuss the association of a virus with sea star melting disease, and the finding of a phycodnavirus in the oropharynx of humans with altered cognitive functions. You can find TWiV #315 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 14 Dec 2014 14:30:43 +0000

    How influenza virus infection might lead to gastrointestinal symptoms
    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also have gastrointestinal symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. In mice, intestinal injury occurs in the absence of viral replication, and is a consequence of viral depletion of the gut microbiota. Intranasal inoculation of mice with the PR8 strain of influenza virus leads […]
    Wed, 10 Dec 2014 17:10:53 +0000

    Viral genomes in 700 year old caribou scat
    Recovering viral genomes from ancient specimens can provide information about viral evolution, but not many old nucleic acids have been identified. A study of 700 year old caribou feces reveals that viruses can be protected for long periods of time – under the right conditions. The oldest virus recovered so far is the giant Pithovirus sibericum, […]
    Mon, 08 Dec 2014 13:03:58 +0000

    TWiV 314: Einstein goes viral
    On episode #314 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent travels to Albert Einstein College of Medicine where he speaks with Kartik, Ganjam, and Margaret about their work on Ebolavirus entry, a tumor suppressor that binds the HIV-1 integrase, and the entry of togaviruses and flaviviruses into cells. You can find TWiV #314 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 07 Dec 2014 17:22:43 +0000

    TWiV 313: With viruses like these, who needs enemas?
    On episode #313 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent, Alan, and Rich discuss how norovirus, an enteric virus, can replace the functions of the gut microbiome. You can find TWiV #313 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 30 Nov 2014 15:17:38 +0000

    How ZMapp antibodies bind to Ebola virus
    ZMapp, a mixture of three antibodies against Ebola virus, became a household name after it was used to treat two Americans who were infected while working in Liberia. The structure of these antibodies bound to the Ebola virus glycoprotein suggest how they inhibit infection and ways to improve ZMapp. The three monoclonal antibodies that comprise ZMapp (called c13C6, c2G4, and c4G7) were […]
    Wed, 26 Nov 2014 02:36:31 +0000

    TWiV 312: She sells B cells
    On episode #312 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVbolans discuss the finding that human noroviruses, major causes of gastroenteritis, can for the first time be propagated in B cell cultures, with the help of enteric bacteria. You can find TWiV #312 at www.twiv.tv.
    Sun, 23 Nov 2014 14:31:38 +0000


The Microbe Blog - by Moselio Schaechter & Merry Youle American Society for Microbiology:

Small Things Considered
A blog for sharing appreciation of the width and depth of microbes and microbial activities on this planet.
2014-12-17T20:21:00-08:00

    Pictures Considered #22. Viva La Resolución!
    by Christoph Weigel | Why should we consider this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry, and why in our 'Pictures Considered' section in the first place? A hint comes from one of the many press releases: "... for improving the resolution of optical microscopes." Aha! Microscopes are at the heart of microbiology since...
    2014-12-18T12:06:48-08:00

    TWiM #93: Worming in on Bacteria
    Vincent, Elio, and Michael reveal that a soil-dwelling nematode can recognize and respond to a bacterial quorum sensing molecule through a sensory neuron.
    2014-12-16T08:22:22-08:00

    Retrospective, December 2014
    As is our custom at this time of year, we go over the material that has appeared in this blog over the last six months. Seems like a lot of stuff, but it’s the result of the work of quite a number of dedicated people, all of whom deserve our gratitude.
    2014-12-11T17:46:39-08:00

    "The Great Plate Count Anomaly" that is no more
    by Gemma Reguera | For over a century, microbiologists have been using growth media solidified with agar to culture microbes from environmental samples. Individual cells are easily separated on the solid surface, allowing each cell to grow and divide and form a colony of thousands of clones. We can change the nutrients in the media and physical parameters such as...
    2014-12-10T20:42:00-08:00

    Terminal Proteins: Crossing the Border
    by Merry Youle | A variety of Bacteria, Archaea, and mobile genetic elements replicate their DNA as a linear chromosome using terminal proteins (TPs) to prime DNA synthesis, thus solving their end replication problem. As described in an earlier post, phage φ29 uses its TPs to also organize the sites of DNA replication for greater efficiency.
    2014-12-08T01:02:10-08:00


Laikaspoetnik Blog Virology/Infectious Diseases entries:

To Retract or Not to Retract… That’s the Question
In the previous post I discussed [1] that editors of Science asked for the retraction of a paper linking XMRV retrovirus to ME/CFS. The decision of the editors was based on the failure of at least 10 other studies to confirm these findings and on growing support that the results were caused by contamination. When the authors refused […]
Tue, 07 Jun 2011 13:34:25 +0000

Science Asks to Retract the XMRV-CFS Paper, it Should Never Have Accepted in the First Place.
Wow! Breaking! As reported in WSJ earlier this week [1], editors of the journal Science asked Mikovits and her co-authors to voluntary retract their 2009 Science paper [2]. In this paper Mikovits and colleagues of the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) and the Cleveland Clinic, reported the presence of xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells […]
Thu, 02 Jun 2011 21:34:34 +0000

Does the NHI/FDA Paper Confirm XMRV in CFS? Well, Ditch the MR and Scratch the X… and… you’ve got MLV.
The long awaited paper that would ‘solve’ the controversies about the presence of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related virus (XMRV) in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was finally published in PNAS last week [1]. The study, a joint effort of the NIH and the FDA, was withheld, on request of the authors [2], because it contradicted […]
Mon, 30 Aug 2010 03:32:21 +0000